Welcome to August


According to medieval calendars, August is the time for harvesting, threshing and reaping your corn, so you’d best get on that.

Got Medieval is going to be going on hiatus for the month of August, so that your humble bloggist can move (again), go to three weddings, and work up a western civ course for the fall. Oh yeah, and there’s that dissertation thing, too.

Notable medieval events that happened in August include:

  • August 1st, 1492: The Jews are expelled from Spain.
  • August 10th, 991: The Battle of Maldon, where Byrtnoth fell, his ofermod spawning a thousand subsequent scholarly skirmishes.
  • August 12th, 1099: The Battle of Ascalon, the final major battle of the First Crusade.
  • August 15th, 778: The Battle of Roncesvalles, where the shot heard round the world is made by Roland’s brains exiting his ears.
  • August 15th, 1040: King Duncan I of Scotland killed by a fellow you may have heard of, goes by the name of Macbeth.
  • August 22nd, 1485: The Battle of Bosworth Field, more fodder for that Shakeshaft guy.
  • August 23rd, 1305: William Wallace, AKA Braveheart, is executed. Mel Gibson rejoices.
  • August 24th, 410: The Visigoths sack Rome and everyone has to change their desk calendars over from Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages.

See all of y’all when I’m back from my bloggervation, right after Labor Day.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Logan

    1. I thought the desk-calendar change is commonly thought to have been in 476 ?

    2. Referencing ofermód and Tolkien: awesome

    3. I’d like to see more posts without the whole footnote gimmick.

  • Jennifer Lynn Jordan

    Hey look at my blog! I just gave you a silly pointless award. =)

  • inthemedievalmuddle
  • pilgrimchick

    Looks like “campaigning” should be added to the whole threshing thing for this month.

  • Livia Indica

    Hi Carl, I’m nominating you for a blog award on my tattoo blog.

  • Pingback: Whan That Augst — Got Medieval

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